The Song of Mekada

Composed by the Queen of Sheba for King Solomon
And Translated from the Ancient Cuneiform by Basil Tuxaxle*

                                                                        [dolce]

    Tidal pools are sharpened notes
      Composed across a staff of rocks.
     We share ecstasies here with starfish
       Among harmonic star grass gliding.
   Starflowers bloom beneath the tides.
Deep hollow caverns are filling up
 With swimmers pleasured in the wakes of passing tones.

    Blanket me with your warm surf.
      Fire wondrous rockets cloud-ward.
     Rain ripe living kisses on my face.
       Explode chromatic star shells within our jet stream.
   Spurt star-spangled fireworks white against the sky.

On the surface of the stargazed sea,
 Only star weed grows where once our passions flamed.
    Our pool gluts from hidden tidal springs.
      In my hand I scoop up two orchestral planets,
     Alive with bristling energy.
       High above these orbs of desire,
   The mouth of your sea dome pouts.

Let your life-rockets anticipate my tender strokes.
 Let your melodies come rising toward the waves.
    Who gently clasps your flowered coral ridges,
      Running musical fingers under your breasts?
     What embrace gathers all symphonic waters
       Like sweet dews floating allegro cantabile?
   In waltz time the trumpeter swan sings secrets.

Then, come to the tidal pool.
 Bathe in our ménage à trois of the soul.


                                                                                    Copyright © 1989, 2005 by Basil Tuxaxle

*EDITOR: Although Basil Tuxaxle claims to have been given this text by Margot Motherchurch, who supposedly exhumed it on the planet Morbyx, it is doubtful if Mr. Tuxaxle knows sufficient cuneiform to have translated the original sandstone tablet. A claim for hieroglyphics might be easier to believe. It is also hinted by some authorities that the last two lines of the poem were never in the original text of Mekada but that Margot added the final couplet to the completed poem because she wanted to "soften" the erotic suggestions, of which she was not sure she approved. Of course, with Basil Tuxaxle and Margot Motherchurch, one never knows anything for sure.